Tim Presley (White Fence) has published his new visual art and poetry bookUnder The Banner of Concern, published by Anthology Editions and out 8/25.  You can check out a video clip of the book below and you should probably read more.   

Under the Banner of Concern is a compilation of drawings and poetry from acclaimed artist and musician Tim Presley. Featuring art from Presley’s 2019 exhibition in Chicago and Los Angeles—Under the Banner of Concern—the black ink drawings merge abstracted and expressionistic brush and line work, the latter of which breaks down figures into simple forms. Characterized by Presley’s “every figure” symbology in their emptied out flat bodies and hollowed eye sockets, these figures are represented both as sexualized and mask-like. In addition to his exhibited drawings, the book will also feature previously unreleased artwork, as well as new poetry from Presley.

Tim Presley is a musician, producer, and artist based in San Francisco, who began his career with the hardcore punk bands Model American and The Nerve Agents. In addition to releasing music under his own name, he has also released albums under DRINKS, W-X, and most notably as White Fence—which he has performed under since 2010. Presley has exhibited select artwork around the country, and previously published his art and poetry in You Don’t Have Your Eyes Yet (2010) and Mush (2016).

Trinie Dalton is an author, artist, professor, and curator based in Los Angeles. She has authored seven books including Destroy Bad Thoughts Not Your OwnBaby Geisha, and Wide Eyed. She has reviewed art, books, and music for publications such as ArtforumThe Believer, and Paper. Dalton’s interest in cross-disciplinary thinking influences her teaching of storytelling craft.

Tim Presley likes to spend time with himself. There is nobody I would rather spend time with either. His mind is gold. I find myself both jealous of and grateful for his casual conjuring of the familiar through an unfamiliar lens ( or wait, is it the other way ‘round?). Engagement through absurdity. This man is a movement of one.

A man walks into a barber shop and asks for a “Tim Presley”.

I kid you not.

Tim Presley walks into a barber shop and asks for a light.

– Cate Le Bon